The American West: Borders and Frontiers (aka Frontiers)

Grade Breakdown and Assignments

(scroll down for course policies)

 

Participation (including short writing assignments, in-class work, and quizzes (if necessary) 20%

Please come to class prepared to participate in class activities. Participation will be recorded almost daily. The best way to prepare and participate is to read and take notes on the daily assigned readings from the required books and to prepare ahead of time questions or analytical comments about the reading (the blog will help with this especially if you are a more quiet learner). Our learning community is a safe place and no one should feel intimidated. At the same time, we all must remember that an important part of learning is listening and respectful listening and quiet engagement will also be rewarded in our class. Should you be curious at any point about what your participation/attendance grade is, feel free to ask! Your participation will be based on the following rubric:

Participation Rubric
There are a possible 10 points for each day.  You begin each day with 10 points  -- work hard not to lose them!


A student who earns9-10 points for the day will:

A student who earns 8-9 points for the day will:

A student who earns 7-8 points for the day will:

A student who earns 6 or fewer  points for the day will:

Demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of the subject

Demonstrate a solid understanding of the subjects

Demonstrate a somewhat limited understanding of the subjects

Demonstrate a quite limited understanding of the subjects

Stimulate others to address and engage in the important points and issues for the day

Be uncertain about his/her own analysis of the day’s subject

Be uncertain about his/her own analysis of the day’s subject

Have no analysis of the day’s subject

Add important ideas to the discussion

Add  some ideas to the discussion

Add  very few ideas to the discussion

Add no ideas to the discussion

Directly address specific content from the readings at least once during discussion

Generally, not specifically, refer to the readings

Not demonstrate their close reading

Demonstrate they have not read for the day

Show respect for colleagues and Dr. Berry at all times (this includes NOT talking when someone else is talking)

Show respect for colleagues and Dr. Berry at all times (this includes NOT talking when someone else is talking)

Sometimes talk while others are talking, but generally show respect

Constantly talk while others are talking

Have thoroughly familiarized self with topic

Have familiarized him/herself with the topics, but will be a bit uncertain on some details

Be a bit uncertain on some details for the course material for the day

Will be rather clueless

Offer clear, accurate answers for questions

Offer clear, accurate answers for questions

Attempt to answer for questions but may offer searching or imprecise answers

Will demonstrate they have not read for the day

Try to help others clarify difficult concepts

Try to help others clarify difficult concepts

Not try to help others clarify difficult  concepts

Will not be willing to help others

Perform brilliantly on the day’s in-class and/or homework assignments

Perform highly on the day’s in-class and/or homework assignments

Complete in-class and/or homework assignments, but work is sloppy/poor

Not complete in-class and/or  homework assignments,

Listen intently and come to learn and have fun

Listen intently and come to learn and have fun

Listen intently and come to learn and have fun

Generally not want to be in class 

 

Roundtable Discussions on Networks 15%:

Rubric to come. Discussion will occur throughout the semester and will serve as assessment of learning to that point! So these are VERY important. If a student misses class on Roundtable day, they will complete a one on one rountable with Dr. Berry at tutorial. These will often (usually) be paired with an essay also.

Hetch Hetchy Debate 5%:

You will use the websites on the course schedule to inform your position in the debate. We will have 2 sections to the debate in which you will role-play a particular person in the controversy. In the end, you will contribute a 2-page reflection on your personal position about the Hetch Hetchy controversy (did it change depending on when in history you were thinking about it?). How should we, as residents of this region, balance the needs of the human population with the ecological needs of western watersheds?

 

Create a Lecture -- Mining Project: 5% Assignment details to come.

Comparative Massacre Paper and Rough Draft 20%: Assignment will be posted on our homepage.

Lessening Stream Essay and Draft 10%

Assignment details to come.

Essays on the West 10%:

These essays will wrap up each of the time periods we cover. There will be 2. One on the 19th and one on the 20th. The second will be comparative in nature. Rubric to come.

The Inquiry Project 15%:

You will be required to participate in Project: Inquiry. Description to come. Much of the work on this will occur in collaboration with others not in our class on Rotation Fridays.

Policies:

Academic Integrity !
At St. Gregory, we have an Honor System that is in effect at all times and for all assignments.  When you agree to participate in this class, you pledge to do your own work, to be honest in all of your assignments, and, when borrowing materials from other sources, to give them due credit. Please sign each written assignment pledging that you have upheld the Honor System. Plagiarism is the act of using another person’s ideas or words without giving that person proper credit.  Your work should be original, but if you do use someone else’s idea(s), you MUST cite that person.  When in doubt, CITE IT!

Please refer to your hard copy of our syllabus for the St. Gregory Faculty Handbook definition of academic integrity.

We will discuss what plagiarism is. I will know it when I see it and you will know it when you do it. There are a number of great sites to help you get a handle on the definition. Most importantly, just cite any original thought (that isn't yours) and do your own work. Never submit something you've taken from someone (including the Internet) else. For more info refer to the following sites:

Council of Writing Program Administrators

American Historical Association

Purdue University's OWL


 

 Late Work

If you need an extension for any of the written assignments, you must ask Dr. Berry at least 24 hours in advance for that extension.  We will decide on a reasonable date and then the assignment must be turned in with no further extension (each student is eligible for only one extension/semester).  Late work without an official extension will not be accepted without penalty.  For each day the assignment is late, your grade will be decreased by 1/2 of a letter grade.  For example, if an assignment is 2 days late, your grade automatically will drop from an A to a B-.

Make-up Work

If you have been absent, see me the day you return, and we will discuss any missed in-class assignments. Please hand in late homework as soon as possible (the above late work policy will, of course, apply to ALL absences, including excused absences for any assignment assigned more than one week in advance). Make-up final exams will NOT be given.

Tardy Policy
The policy is: Do NOT Be Late to Class.  When the bell rings you should be in your seats ready to begin the class.  Walking in late is disruptive and disrespectful and will result in a 10% loss of your participation grade for the day (or a one point deduction).

Grades

See above for grade breakdown.

 

NOT IN 2015

Topic posts: 10%

On a regular basis, you will be required to post to our Schoology Site (which means you need to sign up for access to the site within the first week of the course). Your posts can take different formats. They can be:

1) A blog-like entry where you discuss the reading for the day you are posting (not more than 300 words).

2) An historic image (painting/photograph) that you have found through reasearch about the topic we are discussing for the day you are posting and your analysis of it.

3) A discussion/analysis of an article you have found in High Country News that relates to the topic at hand.

4) A photograph you have taken around town that reminds of you how Tucson fits into (or doesn't fit into) the narratives about the West that we are learning.

All of these posts must include 2 questions for discussion/debate. We will use these to ground our discussions for at least part of each class (this depends, of course, on the relevance and quality of the posts...DB reserves the right to NOT discuss posts that do not pertain to class content).